Good Evening America

Meow.

simply-divine-creation:

» Kelsey Garrity Riley

Reblogged from modosaurus

simply-divine-creation:

» Kelsey Garrity Riley

Reblogged from thesearethemoviesiwatch

Reblogged from cthulhulegobrick5ever

actuallylorde:

onceuponabetsy:

Hey hey, ho ho, UC Regents got to go! (Taken with instagram)

Banana Sluggin’

Reblogged from homo-sapience

actuallylorde:

onceuponabetsy:

Hey hey, ho ho, UC Regents got to go! (Taken with instagram)

Banana Sluggin’

(Source: batraquomancy)

bunnyfood:

(via theclearlydope:tastefullyoffensive:via)

Reblogged from cthulhulegobrick5ever

bunnyfood:

(via theclearlydope:tastefullyoffensive:via)

Reblogged from freelittle-soul

Reblogged from delphiniumsmiles

my-placenta-is-on-fire:

scarecrowartist:

bekkaa:

sweeter-than-tea:

Did you know that by spelling the english word SOCKS outloud, you are also saying the spanish phrase Eso si que es, which means “it is what is is”. 

My spanish teacher told us this last year and I will never forget it

(Source: dashofserendipity)

Reblogged from planet-one

thefluffingtonpost:

PHOTO OP: Goofball
Via philvalles.

Reblogged from delphiniumsmiles

thefluffingtonpost:

PHOTO OP: Goofball

Via philvalles.

nevver:

“God is an ever receding pocket of scientific ignorance.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Reblogged from peachy-tay

nevver:

“God is an ever receding pocket of scientific ignorance.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Reblogged from planet-one

(Source: pinec0nez)

cuntofdoom:

memoryblocks:

waffleguppies:

obesealpaca:

do you think he knows

What I find really astonishing isn’t that a giant land snail managed to earn a doctorate, but that he managed to land a national TV spot despite displaying this kind of egregious, disrespectful behaviour towards his co-host.

#for god’s sake dr. fisher #get off the poor man’s face #you’re a snail of science #act like it 

it got better

Reblogged from ohmythoughtsiconfess

cuntofdoom:

memoryblocks:

waffleguppies:

obesealpaca:

do you think he knows

What I find really astonishing isn’t that a giant land snail managed to earn a doctorate, but that he managed to land a national TV spot despite displaying this kind of egregious, disrespectful behaviour towards his co-host.

it got better

(Source: 4est)

The Top 10 Most Startling Facts About People of Color and Criminal Justice in the United States

Reblogged from cthulhulegobrick5ever

sinidentidades:

1. While people of color make up about 30 percent of the United States’ population, they account for 60 percent of those imprisoned. The prison population grew by 700 percent from 1970 to 2005, a rate that is outpacing crime and population rates. The incarceration rates disproportionately impact men of color: 1 in every 15 African American men and 1 in every 36 Hispanic men are incarcerated in comparison to 1 in every 106 white men.

2. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one in three black men can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. Individuals of color have a disproportionate number of encounters with law enforcement, indicating that racial profiling continues to be a problem. A report by the Department of Justice found that blacks and Hispanics were approximately three times more likely to be searched during a traffic stop than white motorists. African Americans were twice as likely to be arrested and almost four times as likely to experience the use of force during encounters with the police.

3. Students of color face harsher punishments in school than their white peers, leading to a higher number of youth of color incarcerated. Black and Hispanic students represent more than 70 percent of those involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Currently, African Americans make up two-fifths and Hispanics one-fifth of confined youth today.

4. According to recent data by the Department of Education, African American students are arrested far more often than their white classmates. The data showed that 96,000 students were arrested and 242,000 referred to law enforcement by schools during the 2009-10 school year. Of those students, black and Hispanic students made up more than 70 percent of arrested or referred students. Harsh school punishments, from suspensions to arrests, have led to high numbers of youth of color coming into contact with the juvenile-justice system and at an earlier age.

5. African American youth have higher rates of juvenile incarceration and are more likely to be sentenced to adult prison. According to the Sentencing Project, even though African American juvenile youth are about 16 percent of the youth population, 37 percent of their cases are moved to criminal court and 58 percent of African American youth are sent to adult prisons.

6. As the number of women incarcerated has increased by 800 percent over the last three decades, women of color have been disproportionately represented. While the number of women incarcerated is relatively low, the racial and ethnic disparities are startling. African American women are three times more likely than white women to be incarcerated, while Hispanic women are 69 percent more likely than white women to be incarcerated.

7. The war on drugs has been waged primarily in communities of color where people of color are more likely to receive higher offenses. According to the Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have higher rate of arrests. African Americans comprise 14 percent of regular drug users but are 37 percent of those arrested for drug offenses. From 1980 to 2007 about one in three of the 25.4 million adults arrested for drugs was African American.

8. Once convicted, black offenders receive longer sentences compared to white offenders. The U.S. Sentencing Commission stated that in the federal system black offenders receive sentences that are 10 percent longer than white offenders for the same crimes. The Sentencing Project reports that African Americans are 21 percent more likely to receive mandatory-minimum sentences than white defendants and are 20 percent more like to be sentenced to prison.

9. Voter laws that prohibit people with felony convictions to vote disproportionately impact men of color. An estimated 5.3 million Americans are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction. Felony disenfranchisement is exaggerated by racial disparities in the criminal-justice system, ultimately denying 13 percent of African American men the right to vote. Felony-disenfranchisement policies have led to 11 states denying the right to vote to more than 10 percent of their African American population.

10. Studies have shown that people of color face disparities in wage trajectory following release from prison. Evidence shows that spending time in prison affects wage trajectories with a disproportionate impact on black men and women. The results show no evidence of racial divergence in wages prior to incarceration; however, following release from prison, wages grow at a 21 percent slower rate for black former inmates compared to white ex-convicts. A number of states have bans on people with certain convictions working in domestic health-service industries such as nursing, child care, and home health care—areas in which many poor women and women of color are disproportionately concentrated.

"In a way, her strangeness, her naiveté, her craving for the other half of her equation was the consequence of an idle imagination. Had she paints, or clay, or knew the discipline of the dance, or strings, had she anything to engage her tremendous curiosity and her gift for metaphor, she might have exchanged the restlessness and preoccupation with whim for an activity that provided her with all she yearned for. And like an artist with no art form, she became dangerous."

Reblogged from science-sorcerer

Toni Morrison (via wantons0up)

Sula was one of the most important books of my entire life. (via professorfangirl)

(Source: disconymph)

Reblogged from science-sorcerer

(Source: misterfingers)